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Sunday, December 13, 2009

I'll Give this a solid WTF?

Um yeah, something just ain't right. Made to look like a PSA graded card.

I'm not going to call him a fraud, but I have never seen anything like this.

Andy

I appreciate your comment and updated the post because of an answer I got from the Topps Archives blog.

2 comments:

Tim said...

Maybe he's starting a new counterfeit hobby. That's just plain wrong!

Andy said...

Hi:

This is a post I placed on Sportscardinfo, in response to a response they did on your post here.

http://sportscardinfo.wordpress.com/2009/12/14/62-topps-printing-plate-scam/

I spoke to two dealers that I have dealt with on numerous occasions and whom I consider my go-to guys when it comes to expertise on common and especially rare football card related memorabilia, values, and identifications. I will summarize key items they told me below. Please keep in mind I am being objective, not combative with the above post or in trying to justify the purchase I made on these. I didn’t spend enough money for it to be a worry even if they did turn out to be fakes. I’m delighted with adding these to my collection. I am more intrigued by the fact that there is discussion on these among us collectors and am always interested in learning all I can about my collection/hobby. Also, I am commenting on the 62 Football Plates only, not the strange PSA ‘looking’ Mercer baseball plate also mentioned.

-With regards to assuming the 1962 Topps football plates are fakes:

-The original poster makes the assumption based on the price the seller listed them at. The first dealer I spoke to stated “I have never heard nor do I believe these printing plates are fakes. It would be too costly to try and replicate. Original printing plate proofs are worth approximately 10 times the value of the actual item produced.” While the ebay seller might be listing them at a high price, that in it of itself shouldn’t determine authenticity. The second expert I asked stated “to base it (authenticity) strictly on price is absurd”.

-The original poster also assumes that they are fakes since they are not on the Topps Vault sale list from ‘89 and don’t have certificates of authenticity. My first source states “I have only seen original artwork for cards that were stamped ”1989 Topps Auction” or something like that. I think the other items like test color progression cards & these plates came with a letter that covered the entire lot group.”

-Both sellers also commented on the difficulty it would be in re-producing these, and that the cost would likely outweigh the possible gain. A last note of interest as my other expert stated: “The only thing I question, is the one-of-a-kind mention. The bucks were done in two colors (black & green), while the cards were done in four colors, as most of these types of items were. There would be one print plate normally for each color. So any card would have 4 – just for the front, and 4 for the back.

My last thought is my opinion that the ‘one of a kind ‘irreplaceable’ labels included along with placing SOME of the plates in screwdowns was done simply to dress up these plates for later sales.

-Again, looking forward to everyone’s thoughts.
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